Developing musical expression and individuality

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  JJ 2 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #1390

    Ryan P
    Participant

    “We all have an inner voice but not all of us are able to connect with it and let it guide us”

    http://www.thestrad.com/cpt-latests/8-ways-to-develop-musical-expression-and-individuality

    #1403

    Jonathan
    Participant

    Thank you Ryan, this is a nice little article. I even remember one of the original articles, the one by Meribeth Bunch.

    I don’t have the original anymore, but 2 points stand out for me here. The first being “The first prerequisite for presence is focusing on the musical message rather than yourself”. Not the first time any of us have heard this, but none the less spot on.

    The second point, “The characteristics of performers with presence are those who have positive attitudes and thoughts and the ability to focus and visualise their goals and the courage to trust that ability to work for them”. Positive thinking. But not just positive thinking, also visualisation, and being positive about the visualisation working!

    I think both positive thinking and visualisation can have an enormous effect on technique as well. It’s a trap to think that it’s all physical work, locking yourself in a room etc.

    #1411

    JJ
    Participant

    Hi, this is my first post here, I’m an Alexander Teacher. Very pleased to have found this site!

    I resonate with this point by David Kettle:

    I became increasingly aware of very different attitudes to the interpretation of the music through facial expressions, body movements and players’ use (or abuse) of their instruments. Did they feel they were intensifying the music’s meaning?

    I see this so much. Performers striving for individuality with all manner of grotesque movements. It might feel good for them at the time, and might look interesting, but it certainly doesn’t add anything to the music. If anything it gets in the way of musical expression.

    But then again, it’s all part of the show

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